Dutch catering industry wants ‘refrigerator compensation’ for Christmas lockdown – American and British restaurants voluntarily close every other day – Foodlog

The Corona effect of the weekend of 18 and 19 December 2021, the Foodlog selection of the corona news from the (inter)national press. The Corona effect highlights cracks in the food chain, traces of new food systems and the ‘new healthy’. Here you will find our previous selections, in Spotted our daily newsroom.

“They are letting us sink into shit because of this lockdown, it’s a big bastard,” says a ferocious Gilles Harthoorn of Hotel Restaurant Duinzicht on Schiermonnikoog in MissetHoreca (1.3). Restaurants are left with large, unsaleable stocks due to the unexpectedly quickly introduced lockdown. Harthoorn is not alone, the catering industry feels ‘crippled’ (1.5) by the new measures, or gives the pipe to Maarten (De Telegraaf, 1.2).

Just before the holidays, many restaurateurs had gone big to ‘thin’ (3.7) and sell takeaway menus. Those supplies can now go to the food bank, or to the homeless. That is not a solution for Harthoorn: there is no food bank on Schiermonnikoog. Koninklijke Horeca Nederland is of the opinion that catering entrepreneurs should be compensated for purchases for which there will be no turnover with a ‘refrigerator compensation’.

In Great Britain, restaurants and cafes are also closing, even though the government has not (yet) imposed any measures in that direction (AD, 1.6). It is the catering entrepreneurs themselves who are closing their doors, on the one hand because they have to deal with a stream of cancellations and loss of staff due to the rapid rise of the omikron variant, and on the other because they want to protect their staff and customers. Great Britain has not provided any government aid. Paul Donovan, a noted British economist, thinks this “voluntary collapse of entertainment and services” is an omen of an economy not recovering.

In the United States, catering entrepreneurs are also in sack and ashes. As soon as an employee tests positive, they temporarily close the doors, and if an infected customer reports. It’s raining closures and reopenings across the country. That is a matter of good employership. Certainly in times of staff shortages – such as now – employers must show that they are committed to the safety of their employees. “I have a responsibility for the health and well-being of my staff and their safety, their mental safety,” restaurateur Alex McCoy said in a statement. The Washington Post (1.1). “It’s not just about a positive or negative test. It’s also about them being in the right mindset and understanding that they are safe and that they are taken care of. They will be protected.”

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Dutch catering industry wants ‘refrigerator compensation’ for Christmas lockdown – American and British restaurants voluntarily close every other day – Foodlog

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